Flies [MUSCA DOMESTICA]

The house fly, Musca domestica is one of the most common of all insects. It is worldwide in distribution and is a pest in homes, barns, and poultry houses, food processing plants, dairies, and recreation areas. It has a tremendous breeding potential and during the warmer months can produce a generation in less than two weeks.

House flies feed by using sponging type mouthparts. As the fly moves about from one food source to another, it samples and eats its food by regurgitating liquid and dropping it on the food to liquefy it.

Flies are the most common of all pests.

Further Information

InMaltathe house fly breeds continually throughout the year because of our climate.

Light colored spots called fly specks are visible signs of this type of feeding. The darker fly specks that you might see on different areas in your home are fecal spots.

House fly eggs are laid in almost any type of warm organic material. The whitish eggs, which are laid in clusters of 75-100, hatch within 24 hours into tiny larvae or maggots. In 4 to 6 days the larvae migrate to drier portions of the breeding medium and pupate. The pupa stage may vary in length considerably, but in warm Maltese weather this can be about three days. When the adult emerges from the puparium, the wings are folded in tight pads.

The house fly crawls about rapidly while the wings unfold and the body dries and hardens. Under normal conditions this may take as little as an hour. Mating occurs immediately. A house fly may go through an entire life cycle; egg, larva, pupa to winged adult in 6 to 10 days inMaltaand an adult house fly may live an average of 30 days.

During warm weather 2 or more generations may be produced per month. Because of this rapid rate of development and the large numbers of eggs produced by the female, large populations build up.

The feeding and breeding habits of flies contaminate food with harmful bacteria and viruses.

Although the danger of passing on diseases is high because of their proximity to humans and food, their risk are often not correctly assessed by the general public.

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